OpenMediaVault Issues

So my OpenMediaVault (OMV) NAS did reboot today for some reason. It didn’t manage to boot up successfully again, however, but entered “emergency mode” instead.
After some digging around it seems this is related to the combination of LUKS drive encryption and MergerFS (same with UnionFS).
For normal operation, first the LUKS drives need to be decrypted. Then the decrypted drives can be pooled together with MergerFS.
Some changes in OMV 5 (as compared to OMV 4) cause the boot sequence to enter emergency mode if not all drives in /etc/fstab can be mounted while booting. Since the LUKS drives are still encrypted when booting, mounting those drives obviously fails. And consequently mounting the MergerFS filesystem also cannot succeed.

The issue can be patched by adding the nofail option to all LUKS drives in /etc/fstab and also adding the noauto option to the MergerFS entry in /etc/fstab. It may only be a matter of time until OMV decides to rewrite /etc/fstab, thus nullifying the changes described above.

But since I do not reboot my NAS that often, the above patch works fine for now.


References:

  1. https://forum.openmediavault.org/index.php?thread/30129-problem-booting-up-with-luks-and-unionfilesystem/&pageNo=2
  2. https://forum.openmediavault.org/index.php?thread/33186-omv-5-0-keeps-booting-into-emergency-mode-can-t-ssh-in/
  3. https://forum.openmediavault.org/index.php?thread/33213-omv-booting-to-emergency-mode/

Some Docker Best Practices

A lot of things must be considered when creating a Docker image, which can be overwhelming for beginners.
Here are some best practices and gotchas for Docker I collected over time and the reasoning behind them.

First Steps with the Tang Nano FPGA Development Board

The Tang Nano is a very very low cost FPGA development board by Sipeed featuring a GW1N-1-LV FPGA produced by GOWIN Semiconductors. GOWIN is another Chinese chip manufacturer entering the FPGA arena, like Efinix and Anlogic.
The GW1N-1-LV is the smallest member of GOWINs “Little Bee” series, which consists of small footprint instant-on FPGA devices for IoT and interfacing solutions.

The Tang Nano FPGA development board

Writing and Understanding RISC-V Assembly Code

For quite a while I have followed the RISC-V ISA with growing intereset. Now that RISC-V is becoming more and more popular and catching a lot of public attention, it is time to get my hands dirty with some low level RISC-V assembly coding.

Gigabit Transceiver(s) for a Cheap FPGA Development Board

There are a lot of FPGA development boards out there to buy. Official vendor boards with the latest advanced devices on it can easily cost several thousand Euros.
Hobbyists and makers are more interested in FPGA development boards within an affordable price range (roughly << 100 $/€). The logic resources and feature set of the FPGA devices on these boards is not that important on the other hand. The main application for makers/hobbyists is small projects and self-learning, I assume, and not rolling out their own 5G equipment.

First Steps with the iCEBreaker FPGA Development Board

The iCEBreaker board is the first FPGA development board with a fully open-source toolchain, which allows to go all the way from HDL code to configuration bitstream. All the schematics and hardware information is openly available at no extra cost.

First Steps with the Longan Nano RISC-V Development Board

The Longan Nano is a new contestor in the area of affordable RISC-V development boards. The Longan Nano’s form factor and price puts it up against the Arduino Nano and all other varieties of STM32-based “nano boards”, which can be found abundantly on Ebay and AliExpress.

Undelete Files with SnapRAID

Today I accidentally deleted a whole folder of important documents on my OpenMediaVault(OMV) NAS, while doing some cleaning up.
Of course I would have a backup of the folder on an external hard-drive, but this was the perfect opportunity to test SnapRAID.

Getting Started with Magic VLSI

Magic VLSI – or just Magic – is a free and open source VLSI layout software. Simply put Magic allows you to draw the mask layers used in a semiconductor facrication process. The Magic software is another “Berkeley Child” (like BSD and others) and first came into existence in the 1980s. Magic is still under active development as of late 2019.

Some Linux distributions offer a pre-build package for Magic from their package repository. Most often these packages are outdated and therefor it is best to build Magic from the sources.

Getting Started with GHDL

If you haven’t heard of GHDL, it is *the* free open-source VHDL simulator out there.
GHDL stand for “G Hardware Description Language” (the G is without meaning). GHDL is mainly implemented in Ada and can be build with different backends: mcode, LLVM and GCC. The different backends provide different performance levels and vary in build complexity. I recommend LLVM since it performs well and is still quite straight forward to build. Building GHDL from latest sources from its github project is probably the best way to go.

Despite its free nature GHDL provides very good support for all major VHDL-LRM releases: VHDL-1987/1993/200X/2008(partial). Unfortunately GHDL is a pure VHDL simulator, so there is no support for Verilog at all. This is understandable as there are already some very good simulators for Verilog out there.

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